Four Ways to Visualize US Income Inquality

During the course of making my book, I tried to solve the problem of representing the extreme income inequality in the United States using several different graphic approaches. In some cases, I was working with a single data set like The World Top Incomes Database or the Congressional Budget Office. In others graphics, I combined this data with data from Forbes, IRS, and AR: Absolute Returns + Alpha.

Treemap was created using R and the people icons were added in Illustrator, while the cumulative share graphs and the dot plots were create in OmniGraphSkecher.

 

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100 years of Family Spending in the US

My first bar chart illustrates changes in family spending over the 20th century and is based on a report of consumer expenditure data and decennial census reports. This graph shows how the spending on food, clothing and housing has become a smaller percentage of the average family budget, to just over 50%. I them created a second bar chart presenting family spending data in 2009 across different income groups to show how the average family at the beginning of the 20th century was poorer relative to low-income families today when looking at spending patterns. However, this consumer data focuses on families income groups below $150,000 a year and does not tell us what the spending patterns of the top 1% (incomes above $350,000) or top 0.1% (incomes above $1.5 million)

Read Online to view all to the graphics from my book.  

These graphs were created using OmniGraphSketcher copied into Adobe Illustrator for additional annotations. 

Data Source: Dolfman, Michael L., and Denis M. McSweeney. “100 Years of U.S. Consumer Spending: Data for the Nation, New York City, and Boston.” Report no. 991, US Bureau of Labor Statistics. http://www.bls.gov/opub/uscs/.

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My Vision Statement in Harvard Business Review

Harvard Business Review November 2013

Harvard Business Review November 2013

It's out. In the November issue of the Harvard Business Review, you can find my Vision Statement "America's Incredible Shrinking Information Sector" (data/analysis provided by Hank Robison at EMSI) based on the industry sector treemaps I created for An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United StatesSee the interactive version online at HBR.com

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6 Real World Examples of Exponential Growth in Powerpoint

After receiving requests to use some of my graphs in textbooks, emails from teachers and recommendations by EducationWorld and the Library of Congress, I decided to create a series of Powerpoint presentations for teachers. In my first Powerpoint slide deck, I have created and updated examples of exponential growth in economics and finance. This historical data is annotated by major events and covers, in some cases, 200 years of US history. They are useful for interdisciplinary classwork in economics, social studies history as well as math. Besides demonstrating how the logarithmic scale works, this collection of graphs provides examples that show how log scales can illustrate percent changes and growth rates. 

I release my work with a CREATIVE COMMONS BY-NC license so you are free to share/copy these graphs for educational or personal use after you purchase it.

See other product for sale in my shop

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Sports and Income

From An Illustrated Guide to Income in the United States

Million-dollar salaries can be found in professional sports but some of the highest-earning players supplement their incomes with endorsement deals, e.g. Tiger Woods. However, looking at the history of Major League Baseball, we can see a dramatic increase in just the salaries of the highest-paid baseball players since the 1970s, although compared to CEOs or other celebrities their income looks more "modest".

 Read Online to view all to the graphics from my book.  These graphs were created using OmniGraphSketcher copied into Adobe Illustrator for additional annotations. 

Data from 

Freedman, Jonah. “The 50 Highest-Earning American Athletes: The Fortunate 50, 2010.” Sports Illustrated, Summer 2011. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/specials/fortunate50-2010/index.html.

———. “The 50 Highest-Earning American Athletes: The Fortunate 50, 2011.” Sports Illustrated, Summer 2011. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/specials/fortunate50-2011/index.html.

Haupert, Michael. “The Economic History of Major League Baseball.” EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. December 3, 2007. http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/haupert.mlb.

“2010 Baseball Team Payrolls.” About.com Baseball. July 6, 2012. http://baseball.about.com/od/newsrumors/a/2010baseballteampayrolls.htm.

USA Today. “USATODAY Salaries Databases.” July 5, 2012. http://content.usatoday.com/sportsdata/baseball/mlb/salaries/player/top-25/2010.

 

 

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